English

“In the beginning was the word,” John 1:1

"Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic. Capable of both inflicting injury, and remedying it." JK Rowling

 Powerful Knowledge

We believe that through our curriculum and through experiences in English lessons with our English teachers, when our students leave us in Year 11, they will demonstrate our core values and have:

  • A critical appreciation of Shakespeare, his life and works;
  • A critical appreciation of classical literature and the role and influence it has on modern texts and the modern world;
  • A critical appreciation of poetry and the impact it can have on human emotion and the wider world;
  • The understanding of genre and skills needed to be confident and imaginative creative and academic writers;
  • The freedom of thought and skills to be enthusiastic and astute readers;
  • The courage and skills to be self assured and bold public speakers;
  • The knowledge and understanding that great literature and powerful words have the ability to heal, to bring love, to move people and to challenge and change the world for the better.

If students decide to pursue English these attributes will be honed throughout Years 12 and 13 with greater depth, more critical thinking and the skills needed to move onto the next stage.

Curriculum Intent

The English curriculum is designed to provide the best possible preparation for GCSEs whilst also offering a diverse and wide ranging curriculum that attempts to foster a love of reading and develop skilled analytical and creative writers. We have chosen our curriculum to inspire a love of literature by introducing students to some of the most powerful and influential texts in the English literary canon, whilst also giving them the opportunity to explore diverse voices from across time and place.

We want students to leave us as creative and critical readers and writers who are well prepared for the challenges of a modern world.

In English, as in Maths, we strive for our pupils to enjoy and engage in our subject, developing a life-long love of learning.

Key Stage 3

The Key Stage 3 curriculum begins in Year 7 with a fast and challenging start, building on the skills and knowledge accrued in Key Stage 2. This is developed into Year 8 with the introduction of key writers from the literary canon and theoretical analysis of creative writing. Year 9 allows further exploration of a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts with the opportunity to experience different voices from different times and places. The second half of Year 9 sees the introduction of two GCSE texts, which are studied as class readers with a focus on plot and characterisation. In Years 7 and 8 all students will have one library and reading lesson a fortnight. Year 9 will also have some time in their curriculum for reading for pleasure.

Due to timetabling some students will have some units taught out of sequence. In some cases this will be one lesson a fortnight with a particular teacher either focussing on the key skills of creative writing or reading for meaning and pleasure.

Key Stage 4

The Key Stage 4 curriculum is structured differently with Language and Literature being taught separately in explicit lessons. There is a five/two split in favour of Literature for most groups. This split will be in favour of Language for one group, however, who will focus on The Step-Up to English qualification in Year 10, building to the full GCSE in Year 11. The reason for this uneven divide, in the most part, is due to the heavy Literature content and the fact that many of the skills needed for the Language papers can be taught through the Literature course. The explicit Language and Literature lessons however, will reaffirm for the students that they are studying for two separate GCSEs. The Year 11 course focuses on revision and building on the knowledge previously taught in Years 9 and 10. All of the key texts are revised with a focus on structure, context and closer analysis, as well as introducing more explicit examination skills.

In Year 11, English and Maths have a co-ordinated approach to mock examinations and, following these examinations, a target cohort is identified of those students who need intervention to achieve a Grade 4+ in both English and Maths.

Key Stage 5

At A Level Literature, the students follow the OCR course and the curriculum is structured in a way to provide them with a strong grounding in elements essential for Literature study, such as an understanding of a writer’s craft, how a text is influenced by the context in which it is written and received, and critical theory. Students explore a range of Literature, from across time periods and places, and are encouraged to read widely around their set texts, expanding their literary horizons in preparation for possible undergraduate study of the subject. Students are encouraged to engage in debate and class discussion, and develop a confident individual and analytical approach to their study of the texts.

Currently, the students study American Literature from 1880-1940, including detailed study of two classic novels, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. This component also includes the analysis of an unseen extract, requiring a thorough knowledge of American literary movements and history from the studied time period. Another component, British Drama and Poetry Pre-1900, requires a comprehensive study of the Shakespeare play Richard III, with students being introduced to dramatic interpretations of the play over time. A second part of this exam compares key themes in the Oscar Wilde play An Ideal Husband with a range of poetry by Christina Rossetti. Students complete two pieces of Non-Exam Assessment, focused on a novel, play and poetry published after 1900 (with one being published post- 2000) ensuring a coverage of a range of time periods and genres (TEXTS TBC).

In Media Studies, the students follow the AQA course and undertake both practical and theoretical tasks. The curriculum aims to provide students with detailed theory necessary to explore media texts, whilst also allowing them to develop the skills and independence to create their own, thus preparing them for further study or careers in this ever-growing industry. The details of this course are explained more fully in the unit breakdown section.

Curriculum Enrichment

Students are encouraged to read for pleasure and explore a wide variety of texts including both fiction and non-fiction. In conjunction with our librarian and our Learning Resource Centre we offer all students in Years 7 and 8 the opportunity to attend Reading Club in which they are paired with a Year 12 buddy who supports the student with their reading. To encourage a love of reading to highlight the importance of this in later life we also have Story Club which is open to all students via a teacher invitation for excellent work or effort. At this club the students are read an extract of a story by a member of staff who then explains why they have selected and recommended this book to the students. Our students are also offered many opportunities to enter creative writing competitions with many resulting in having their work published.

Theatre trips and organising visits from travelling theatre companies has also provided us with the opportunity to enrich our curriculum and to offer the opportunity to students to see texts performed.

Media Students also have the opportunity to attend an educational visit to the BBC, Media City and the University of Salford, to gain an appreciation of how the industry works and routes of career progression.

Cultural Capital

Cultural capital is the accumulation of knowledge, behaviours, and skills that a student can draw upon and which demonstrates their cultural awareness, knowledge and competence; it is one of the key ingredients a student will draw upon to be successful in society, their career and the world around them.

In English, this means we explore what we believe to be the most culturally important and culturally significant knowledge in our subject area. We do this, by exploring literary texts from the English canon such as Shakespeare and Dickens to more modern writers such as Orwell. We also ensure that our students experience the work of writers of diverse voices and opinions, thus enabling an exploration of texts which have the power to move and influence people. This enables our students to learn about how and why some texts became culturally significant in the Western world and whether these texts are still relevant in a contemporary society; whilst also exploring texts from writers from different backgrounds and from around the world. In English, we firmly believe that our curriculum and powerful knowledge is interwoven with knowledge, behaviours, and skills which provide our students with a high level of cultural capital and the confidence to challenge the literary status quo.

Cross curricular integration

Our curriculum is designed with a clear knowledge and understanding of both the Drama and History curriculums with the intention of providing support to one another and our students through the teaching of key concepts and time periods.

Drama:
The reading of Blood Brothers in Year 7 will support the curriculum of the Drama department who use this text later this term as a stimulus for dramatic skills;
The analysis of Shakespeare and other dramatic texts including the shared use of key terminology.

History:
The ‘Romanticism’ unit makes cross-curricular links to History in Year 8 and the Industrial Revolution;
Key historical figures are studied in the ‘Power of the Spoken Word’ unit.
A Christmas Carol, ‘The Victorian Era’ and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde all makes close links to the unit on The Victorians;
The ‘Crime and Punishment’ unit in Year 10 makes close links to Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde;
In the study of Shakespeare plays and his world we focus on the day in the life of an Elizabethan or Jacobean person, which links to the unit on Tudors and Stuarts.

Transition learning opportunities

  • Year 5 Days organised and led by the English department with a focus on Shakespeare and Macbeth;
  • Year 5 day with sessions led by the English department with a murder mystery investigation using Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde as a stimulus. Also, has the opportunity for student leadership with many Year 10 students taking the opportunity to run sessions and show themselves to be good role models;
  • Year 6 students are asked to provide a one page piece of writing of which they are proud. This is then glued into their English book in Year 7 as a link between Key Stage 2 and 3;
  • Year 6 transition booklet is sent to prospective Year 7 students and includes a unit on Roman mythology as a bridging unit to our first unit in Year 7 - Myths and Legends.
  • Year 7 Summer School provides the opportunity for the students to be creative writers and allow initial assessment for gifted and talented and reluctant readers and writers;
  • Members of the department attend end of Key Stage moderation with Primary colleagues to ascertain levels and expectations.

Homework

Students will be set homework via Firefly on a regular basis. Homework from the English department will consist of two strands. Firstly, it is the expectation that all students from Years 7 to 9 will undertake at least 45 minutes and all students from 10 to 11 will undertake at least 60 minutes of reading homework every week. Ideally, this would be a range of both fiction and non-fiction and a variety of genres and authors. Secondly, students will undertake knowledge-based homework.

The English department homework will centre on the learning of knowledge in an effort to create a culture which sees students develop a five year revision plan rather than a five month one. This will consist of two Knowledge Organiser tests and an application test based on the Knowledge Organiser provided at the start of each unit. If this sheet is mislaid copies can also be found on the English department Firefly page.

How the Knowledge Organiser work:

  • Students receive a copy of the Knowledge organiser sheet at the start of the unit;
  • When homework is set the students will also be provided with a copy of the relevant knowledge or application test;
  • Students should practice answering the questions, using the knowledge organiser sheet to not only increase their knowledge base but also develop revision strategies;
  • Students will then be tested in class.

Homework overview:
Key Stage 3

  • Knowledge or application test set three times per half term;
  • 45 minutes of reading expected per week. The expectation is that students will keep a reading journal which will be checked periodically in reading lessons;
  • Supplementary homework may be set by the class teacher when deemed appropriate to support or enhance the work done in class. This may take the form of research on a particular subject area or revision for assessments;

 Key Stage 4

  • Knowledge or application test set three times per half term;
  • 60 minutes of reading expected per week. In Year 11, the re-reading of exam texts will be expected and as a result more than 60 minutes will be required;
  • Students in Year 11 will also be required to complete a work book about their exam texts;
  • Supplementary homework may be set by the class teacher when deemed appropriate to support or enhance the work done in class. This may take the form of research, practice essay writing or revision for assessments;
  • Students will also be required to use Firefly for revision purposes and read around the topics they are studying. This will not be actively set as homework but is expected.

Key Stage 5
Students who study English at A Level will be expected to supplement their class work with both teacher and self-generated homework. They will be expected to:

  • Read around the subject and topic area being studied;
  • Use the Firefly resources to enhance their understanding of the texts being studied;
  • Watch Massolit lectures to increase their knowledge of a text or writing period;
  • Write essays about the texts being studied;
  • Complete work books.

SEND

The major way in which we support our students with SEND provision is through quality first teaching ensuring the individual needs of all are students are known and met. These ideas are then shared through department meetings. A crucial element when supporting our SEND students is the use of strategic setting. Regular meetings are held between the English department and school SENCO. This is to ensure our SEND students are well supported in the right groups for them. Close links and regular communication with our Teaching Assistants ensure that teachers of SEND students are knowledgeable about each individual student and as a result their individual needs can be catered for. We also have a literacy support worker who through withdrawal sessions works on the literacy needs of a number of students. These sessions are closely linked with the main curriculum ensuring a systematic and co-ordinated approach. As a department we frequently use audio books to support the literacy needs of our students and ensure differentiated resources are available for those students who have those requirements.

Wider Reading

Our students are encouraged to read at every opportunity to support their studies or for pleasure. Every member of the English department is passionate about reading and is on hand to suggest a diverse range of texts of both fiction and non-fiction for our students to explore; every English classroom is equipped with a range of books that students are encouraged to borrow. As students move through school we also encourage the reading of academic critical thinkers to help shape their own ideas.

Suggested reading lists can be found on Firefly, the library and from our English teachers

KS3 - Year 7 Intent

Myths and Legends: Building on a bridging unit sent out to Year 6s on Roman Mythology, this unit explores Greek, Old Norse, and British mythology, including world view, religion and important cultural traditions. Students will read a range of classic stories, explore oral traditions and epic poetry, and study how modern narratives have their roots in myth and legend from throughout history.

Gothic Fiction: To introduce ideas of the gothic genre and expose the students to a range of texts from the literary canon and to develop skills as a creative writer.

Romanticism: Building on Key Stage 2 poetry analysis, this unit explores the central concepts and historical context of Romanticism, with a focus on its major authors and the influence of radical politics, revolution and the beginnings of autobiography (cross-curricular links to History in Year 8 and the Industrial Revolution).

The Power of the Spoken Word: To develop and encourage confident speakers who feel comfortable in talking in front of an audience, whilst also providing students with the opportunity to experience some of the most famous speeches in history. (Cross-curricular links to History and key historical figures and to PSHE and Citizenship).

Exploring Personal Writing: To develop an understanding of how writing can be used to explore personal emotions and individual stories. This also allows the introduction of skills needed to analyse non-fiction.

Shared and Independent Reading: To allow students to read and explore a wide variety of texts which will hopefully take them out of their comfort zone and expose them to different genres and different writers. (Cross-curricular links to Drama. By beginning with the reading of Blood Brothers this will support the curriculum of the Drama department who use this text later this term as a stimulus for dramatic skills.)


KS3 - Year 8 Intent

The Art of the Story: To introduce to the students the idea of structure and narrative theory. Students will also experience a range of short stories and further develop their skills as a creative writer.

A Christmas Carol: To introduce the students to a key figure from the literary canon and develop skills of literary analysis. This unit could also be revisited as a GCSE text for students who have had poor attendance or who are of low ability. (Cross-curricular links to History and their unit on Victorians)

Poetry with Power: To further develop the students’ ability to analyse poetry and introduce them to a wide range of poetry from different eras including the modern day. This unit also provides the opportunity to introduce the skills of comparing poems.

Shakespeare’s World: To introduce students to Shakespeare, and concepts central to understanding his work, through study of a range of sonnets and soliloquies. Students are introduced to several different Shakespeare plays, exploring common themes, and learn about the Globe Theatre. Independent research and presentation skills are developed.

Shakespeare play - The Tempest: To introduce the students to a Shakespearean comedy and encourage students to be confident readers in class. This unit also introduces the students to analysing dramatic methods. This unit could also be revisited as a GCSE text for students who have had poor attendance or who are of low ability.

Literature on Screen: This unit is designed to explore the transition of literary works onto screen It will introduce students to media terminology and skills in analysing moving image.

KS3 - Year 9 Intent (Transition to Key Stage 4)

Tomorrow’s World: To further develop the students ability to analyse non-fiction texts, whilst also exposing them to elements of Science Fiction. This unit also allows the students to develop their skills as a creative writer.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry: To explore attitudes and voices outside of the traditional English literary canon. This class reader has the intention of exploring issues regarding discrimination, the power of language and the importance of identity amongst young people. This unit should expose the students to challenging ideas and challenging vocabulary.

Poetry with theme of Belonging: To introduce the students to poems from around the world based on the theme of Belonging. This could explore issues of identity, place and culture. The students will also compare a familiar poem with an unseen poem to build their confidence in preparation for the GCSE examination.

Greek Tragedy: To introduce the students to tragic structure and early drama. This unit aims to highlight how Shakespeare and later playwrights based their concepts on the works of earlier writers and also to expose the students to some classical literature.

The Victorian Era: To consolidate knowledge of the historical context of the era in preparation for study of Victorian novel for GCSE. Unit will familiarise students with language of Victorian fiction and non-fiction texts and develop their ability to answer Language style questions.

Shakespeare Play: To develop students understanding of Shakespeare in the literary canon and explore conventions of Elizabethan/Jacobean theatre.

Summer Project - Transition to KS4
Spoken Language Assessment: To engage with a subject in which the students feel passionately about and present a speech on that topic to either a small or whole class group. This unit provides students with the opportunity to engage with social issues and provides the opportunity to enter the GCSE Spoken Language Assessment. (Cross-Curricular links to PSHE and Citizenship)


KS4 - Year 10 Intent

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde: To introduce the plot and characterisation of this GCSE text whilst also allowing the students an initial awareness of contextual features (AO1 and AO3) (Cross-curricular links to Victorian Crime and Punishment unit in year 9 and 10).

Animal Farm: To introduce the plot and characterisation of this GCSE text whilst also allowing the students an initial awareness of contextual features (AO1 and AO3) (Cross-curricular links to History and Revolution Unit in Year 9). Please note that Macbeth will be taught in this section of the curriculum in the academic year 2020/21 due disruption caused by Covid-19)

Power and Conflict Poetry: To study the fifteen Power and Conflict poems which are examined as part of the GCSE literature course. These poems have been divided into three sections and will be taught over the course of the year in five poem blocks based around themes.

Unseen Poetry: To understand the explicit skills required when analysing unseen poetry. This unit should allow students to experience a wide range of poetry from different eras but with a sharp focus on contemporary poetry.

Macbeth: To introduce the plot and characterisation of this GCSE text whilst also allowing the students an initial awareness of contextual features (AO1 and AO3) (Cross-curricular links to Tudors and Stuarts unit in year 8).

Explorations in creative writing: This unit aims to build on the work previously undertaken in Key Stage Three in regards to developing the students skills in creative writing. This unit aims to explore how to structure and develop strong openings from a range of stimuli.

Explorations in fiction: Using with either an adventure or dystopian theme the students will explore how writers create impact on their readers through the language choices they make and the structures they use when writing.

Explorations in non-fiction:  This unit will explore non fiction texts under the theme of moral panics. It aims to explore how writers use language to create an effect on their readers. It will also help support the students’ skills of comparison and summarising. (Cross-curricular links to PSHE and Citizenship).


KS4 - Year 11 Intent

Animal Farm: To engage in a closer reading of the text exploring the idea of it as a “conscious construct”, focussing on language structure and form (AO2) and the thematic ideas explored in the novella (AO3).

Macbeth: To engage in a closer reading of the text exploring the idea of it as a “conscious construct”, focussing on language structure and form (AO2) and the thematic ideas explored in the play (AO3).

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde: To engage in a closer reading of the text exploring the idea of it as a “conscious construct”, focussing on language structure and form (AO2) and the thematic ideas explored in the novel (AO3).

Power and Conflict Poetry: To engage in a closer reading of the texts and make more conscious links between the poems, developing exam technique required for this aspect of the GCSE literature course.

Language Paper One: To hone the exam techniques required for this paper and allow the students to continue to develop as creative writers. This unit will also provide students with the opportunity to experience a wide range of extracts and short stories of literary texts.

Language Paper Two: To hone the exam techniques required for this paper and allow the students to continue to develop as writers of non-fiction. This unit will also provide students with the opportunity to experience a wide range of articles from different time periods and engage with at times issues surrounding social injustice (Cross-curricular links to PSHE and Citizenship).

 

KS5 - Year 12 Intent (A Level English Literature)

OCR - A Level Literature

Teacher A:
The Great Gatsby:
To study Fitzgerald’s novel in detail, gaining a thorough understanding of plot, character and theme. As context is the dominant assessment objective, students will learn about The Roaring 20s and New York, Fitzgerald’s life, and issues such as prohibition, and presentation of gender, race and social class. Students will also study a variety of critical interpretations of the novel, and complete an essay on the presentation of women. A workbook is set for homework, allowing students to make detailed notes on each chapter and explore issues raised.

The Grapes of Wrath: An in depth study of Steinbeck’s novel, with a particular focus on the historical context of the Wall Street Crash and Great Depression. Students will also explore the relevance of Steinbeck’s political views, and key themes such as freedom, dreams and community. Students will complete an essay with a close focus on structure, and Steinbeck’s use of intercalary chapters. A workbook is set for homework, allowing students to make detailed notes on key chapters and explore issues raised.

Contextual Study Comparison: Students will study key issues of comparison and contrast between the two novels, exploring how differences between the texts are influenced by issues of wealth, geography and time. Students will be introduced to the cyclical essay structure and how to sustain comparison between texts when writing.

NEA Task 1: A detailed study of a modern novel, to allow students to produce a close analysis of an extract (text TBC).

Teacher B:
Richard III:
An in-depth study of Shakespeare’s play, with a particular focus on the drama of the play. Students will also explore the relevance of Shakespeare’s work to different audiences throughout time focussing on both their own interpretations and those of others. This is achieved through their own reading of the play and the watching and studying of professional productions. Students will complete an essay with a close focus on Shakespeare’s use of language and an exploration of a key theme. A workbook is set for homework, allowing students to make detailed notes on key scenes and explore issues raised.

An Ideal Husband: An in depth study of Wilde’s play, with a particular focus on the historical context of the Victorian era. Students will also explore the relevance of Wilde’s life and key themes such as temptation, love and marriage. Students will complete an essay with a close focus on Wilde’s use of characterisation to explore a particular theme. Students will be expected to research key Victorian ideas, thinkers and writers, investigating their impact on this era.

NEA Task 2: A detailed study of a modern play and poetry text, to allow students to produce an essay comparing a key theme across both (texts TBC).

KS5 - Year 13 Intent (A Level English Literature)

Teacher A:
Unseen Extract:
This unit will give students a thorough understanding of relevant American contextual issues prior to our studied time period of 1880-1940, with a focus on the presentation of frontier life, Native Americans, and slavery. Students will then study the main literary movements during 1880-1940, gaining an understanding of the features of Romanticism, Naturalism and Modernism, and reading a range of texts associated with each movement. Students will be taught a structure for approaching this question in the exam, and get opportunity to complete practice questions, with scaffolding and modelling to begin with, before moving onto more independent practice.

Revision: Students will revisit The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath, looking at key extracts with a greater focus on exam technique and completion of practice exam questions.

Teacher B:
Rossetti Poetry:
This unit will explore and analyse the life and works of Christina Rossetti. The students will focus on the key poems set by the exam board for in depth study. Students will also explore contextual issues which influence the writings of Rossetti. Finally students will begin to make comparative links between the poetry of Christina Rossetti and Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband in regards to themes and context. Students will complete an essay with a close focus on Rossetti’s exploration of a particular theme. Students will be expected to research key Victorian ideas, thinkers and writers, investigating their impact on this era.

Revision: Students will revisit Richard III and An Ideal Husband/Rossetti poetry, looking at key extracts with a greater focus on exam technique and completion of practice exam questions.

KS5 - Intent (A Level Media Studies)

AQA - A Level Media Studies:

Close Study Products (CSPs): Close Study Products (CSPs) are a range of media products that must be studied in order to meet the requirements of the specification and prepare for the exams. A ‘product’ means something produced by a media industry for a media audience, for example, a television programme, a website or a video game. While CSPs are important in themselves as examples of the contemporary – and historical – media landscape, they are particularly significant to the study of the theoretical frameworks; a way of exploring the theories and debates required by the subject content. The CSPs are chosen by the AQA exam board and enable the study of all the following media forms: television; film; radio; newspapers; magazines’; advertising and marketing; online, social and participatory media; video games; music video. The CSPs studied in our curriculum are:

TV Dramas - Deutschland 83 and Capital: Both products provide rich and challenging opportunities for interpretation and in depth critical analysis. In the case of Deutschland 83, it is an opportunity to engage with a product produced in a foreign language.

E-media - Teen Vogue and The Voice: Both texts are online, social and participatory. Teen Vogue gives the opportunity to study Fashion, lifestyle, political and campaigning website and social media sites, whilst The Voice features a news website produced by and targeting a minority group.

Video Games - Metroid Prime 2- Echoes, Tomb Raider- Anniversary and The SIMS Freeplay: For Metroid Prime 2: Echoes students should have knowledge and understanding of this product as a contemporary action adventure game in terms of the relevant issues of representation and its use of media language. Tomb Raider Anniversary offers the opportunity of knowledge and understanding of this product as a contemporary action adventure game in terms of the relevant issues of representation and its use of media language. The SIMS Freeplay Video is a game with online, social, participatory links. The game provides rich and challenging opportunities for analysis and study in relation to all four elements of the theoretical framework.

Print Magazines - Men's Health and Oh: Men’s Health is a magazine that is rich in relation to Media Industries and Media Audiences. This means looking beyond the specific edition to consider issues of ownership, production, funding, technologies and regulation (Media Industries) and targeting, marketing, sales and readership, audience interpretation, fulfilment, uses and gratifications ideas and theories (Media Audiences). Oh is an alternative magazine, aimed at a niche audience. Students will consider issues of ownership, production, funding, technologies and regulation (Media Industries) and targeting, marketing, sales and readership, audience interpretation, fulfilment, uses and gratifications ideas and media theories.

Newspapers - The Daily Mail and The i: The Daily Mail offers many opportunities for studying the relationship between ownership patterns, economic factors and political viewpoints. The history of the Daily Mail provides many examples of the paper’s political influence including some high-profile clashes between the paper and its political opponents. The I is a relatively recently-launched national daily ‘quality tabloid’ which will enable students to compare products and the context in which they are produced and consumed.

Music Videos - Letter to the Free and Ghost Town: Both Letter to the Free and Ghost Town are products which possess cultural and social significance. They will invite comparison, allowing for an analysis of the contexts in which they are produced and consumed. Detailed study of Ghost Town should also enable students to demonstrate appreciation and critical understanding of the historical development of music videos and allow for social, cultural and political comparison with contemporary CSPs.

Advertising and Marketing - Score Hair Cream and Maybelline 'That Boss Life': Score – a pre-1970 product - will invite comparison with other CSP adverts allowing for an analysis of the contexts in which they are produced and consumed. The contemporary Maybelline advertisement possesses cultural, social and historical significance and provides rich and challenging opportunities for interpretation and in depth critical analysis.

Radio - War of the Worlds and Newsbeat: War of the Worlds is an early example of a hybrid radio form, adapting the H.G Welles story using news and documentary conventions. The broadcast and the initial response to it has historical significance as an early, documented, example of the mass media apparently having a direct effect on an audience’s behaviour. The academic research carried out into the broadcast provided some of the early media audience research and the findings have been extremely influential in the media, advertising and political campaigning. Newsbeat is an example of a transitional media product which reflects changes in the contemporary media landscape. Newsbeat is both a traditional radio programme with regular, scheduled broadcast times, but it is also available online after broadcast. The broadcast itself and the use of digital platforms provide opportunities for audience interaction. Newsbeat also exemplifies the challenges facing the BBC as a public service broadcaster that needs to appeal to a youth audience within a competitive media landscape.

Film - Blinded by the Light: Blinded by the Light is an example of low-medium budget film making. Students do not need to watch the film but will need to be familiar with the production context and distribution materials including: websites, posters, trailers and social media presence.                                  

Non exam Assessment (NEA): Students must also create media texts demonstrating technical skills and an understanding of their chosen genre and target audience. In this section of the course, students must choose one from a choice of six briefs and create a cross-media production to fulfil the requirements of that brief and complete: a Statement of Intent that outlines their aims for their cross-media production and an individual cross-media production for an intended audience, applying their knowledge and understanding of the theoretical framework of media studies.